Session

Fireside chat with Garry Kasparov: Our cyber-rights in times of crisis

2020 will forever change the modern history of humankind, and the world of artificial intelligence. Many of our habits and priorities are changing in response to the recent global events. These changes are both confusing and challenging for scientists and experts, as well as for computer algorithms. At Cybersec & AI Connected, Avast Security Ambassador and chess grandmaster Garry Kasparov, who first discovered the potential of artificial intelligence during his famous matches against supercomputer Deep Blue in 1985, will be talking about the future of AI and how it will influence privacy, human rights, and safety.

If we – as a democratic society – want to remain free, safe and healthy, we have to embrace technological progress instead of fearing it, claims Garry Kasparov. Can AI make our rights more equal and our lives safer and free? In his opinion, we have lost decades of technological research that could have left us better prepared for the crisis. Garry Kasparov believes AI is a wonderful tool that will expand our minds the way the telescope extended our vision. But a telescope needs to be aimed accurately in order to get desired results. In a fireside chat, Garry Kasparov will discuss what will need to change in order for AI to help us aim high.

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Biography

Clive is a computer geek from way back. He got interested in them as a child in the early 80s in Toronto, when machines like the Commodore 64 arrived. His parents wouldn’t get their family a computer (his mother worried he’d just “sit around playing games all the time”), but he devoured every book of BASIC programming he could find at the library, and whenever he could cadge some time on a computer at school or a friend’s house, he’d try to do some programming. He created little games, databases, primitive chatbots, digital music, and gradually realized that computers were going to change everything.

In high school, though, Clive decided he wanted to be a journalist. He studied English and political science at the University of Toronto, and after graduating in 1992 he worked as a street musician, a receptionist for a driving school, a bookkeeper, and an administrative cog for the League of Canadian Poets (the country’s most awesomely-named literary organization) — before deciding to become a freelance magazine writer.

This was around the time the Internet hit the mainstream, so he began writing long pieces about how it was changing politics, shopping, art, culture, and everything in between. In the late 90s Clive moved to New York and began writing for magazines he like New York Times Magazine, Wired, Fast Company, New York, Mother Jones and Smithsonian.

His work has won several awards, including an Overseas Press Council Award, a Mirror Award, and in 2002/2003 he was a Knight Science Journalism Fellow at MIT.

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